Category Archives: Education

Remuneration of Scholars in the Academy Scholars Program

person wearing red graduation dress

Jorge I. Dominguez graduated from Yale in 1967 summa cum laude, and earned his PhD from Harvard five years later. He was the chair of the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies for about 14 years. During this time, Jorge I. Dominguez closely oversaw the selection of scholars into the Academy Scholars Program.

The Academy Scholars Program identifies and supports outstanding scholars whose works display disciplinary excellence. These scholars usually specialize in the social sciences, and possess knowledge of the history and languages of cultures outside the US or Canada. Academy Scholars are appointed by the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies for a two-year, in-residence, postdoctoral fellowship with financial support. Only recent PhD recipients or doctoral candidates in the social sciences (including law) are eligible for the Academy Awards Program.

Postdoctoral scholars receive a yearly stipend of $70,000, while scholars picked before getting their PhD get a $35,000 annual allowance until they obtain their doctorate. Scholars also receive funding for conference and research travel, health insurance coverage, and research assistants.

The Weatherhead Center for International Affairs

Jorge I. Dominguez retired in 2018 after an extensive career at Harvard University. As a professor for 46 years, Jorge Dominguez had a number of roles at Harvard, including director of the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs (WCIA).

The WCFIA is dedicated to research in social sciences, and its mission is to help facilitate groundbreaking research for the students and faculty of Harvard. The center offers many ways to assist researchers and incorporates faculty members from across the university. Its focus is the study of international and transnational relations and the comparative experiences of peoples, politics, economies and societies around the globe.

Research requires funding, and the WCFIA offers help. Grants are available for undergraduate students, graduate students, postdoctoral students, and faculty members.

The center also has numerous research groups that include students, faculty members, and visiting scholars. Postdoctoral researchers from other universities from all over the world and experienced practitioners from many countries are invited each year to pursue their goals in the social sciences.

The Cuban Economy in a New Era

Recently retired Harvard University professor Jorge Dominguez taught at the school from 1972 to 2018. Over the course of his career, Jorge Dominguez has authored and edited a wide range of books and articles on political science and international affairs. One of Dr. Dominguez’ most recent projects was co-editing The Cuban Economy in a New Era.

Subtitled “An Agenda for Change toward Durable Development,” the book features contributions from leading Cuban economists who have been collaborating with Harvard scholars for more than a decade. The Harvard University David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies published the book in 2017 for distribution through the Harvard University Press.

The Cuban Economy in a New Era begins by examining a range of challenges within the Cuban economic system, including its bankrupt sugar industry and dilapidated public infrastructure. The book then outlines possible solutions to Cuba’s economic woes in areas that include macroeconomic policy, central planning, state enterprise management, and partnerships with global financial institutions.

Tracing the Transformation of Cuba’s Foreign Policy into Africa

Jorge Dominquez
Jorge Dominquez

An alumnus of Harvard and Yale, Professor Jorge Dominguez is a retired Harvard University faculty member. A member of the Latin American Studies Association, Jorge Dominguez has authored numerous publications on Cuba’s foreign policy, one of which was published in Foreign Affairs. It discussed Cuba’s involvement in Africa in the 1970s.

In 1978, Cuba, a small country in the Americas, had as many as 35,000 troops in Africa, a huge number that caused significant tension between Havana, under President Fidel Castro, and Washington, under President Jimmy Carter. At the time, it was widely believed that Cuba’s foreign policy was an indirect hand played by the Soviet Union. However, this may have not been entirely the case.

In the early 1960s, Cuba’s communist leadership under President Castro generated a hostile reaction from the United States. Suspicions between the two ideologically opposite states were already rife, and disputes over serious issues only made the tensions worse. The Cuban regime’s survival, in the wake of such hostility, was critical, necessitating the administration’s dalliance with the Soviet Union. In fact, the Soviet Union’s financial assistance propped up Cuba’s economy and redistribution programs for a long time.

However, things changed when the United States’ economic embargoes went global. That’s when some foreign nations and multinationals restricted trade with Cuba. Foreign support from the USSR also waned in the late 1960s because of geographical distance, disagreements between them, and inefficiencies at both ends, prompting Cuba to look for partners elsewhere. It developed relations with China and Morocco, but it later sought new ties with African countries to change the anti-Cuba narrative that was quickly spreading. Cuba thus became a small country with a big foreign policy footprint, especially in Africa.